Visiting s/v Freedom

Posted on Friday 17 August 2012

Earlier this week, I sailed s/v Pretty Gee down to Cuttyhunk to visit with my friends Ed and Chris on their Endeavour 42 s/v Freedom. They’re on the southbound leg of a cruise down to the Caribbean. They set out a while back from the Great Lakes and don’t really have a set ending date for this cruise.

s/v Pretty Gee and I got to Cuttyhunk’s outer harbor about 1745, after a long sail to windward. Of course, the wind was out of the southwest and pretty much directly on the nose. We had been hailed by s/v Freedom around 1600 and they had asked us our ETA, which I had estimated to be around 1800. They were holding dinner until I got there.

It was a bit longer to go around Pekinese Island, but with the wind out of the southwest, it made more sense to sail at almost 9 knots and go a bit further than it did to try and tack into the northeast channel or motor—both of which would have been much slower. I furled the screacher northwest of Pekinese Island. I then started up the engine and dropped the main sail as I turned south to head for the northwest channel entrance to Cuttyhunk.

I motored into Cutthyhunk outer harbor after a fairly fast reach under screacher and main to northwest of Pekinese Island, which lies on the northern edge of Cuttyhunk outer harbor. Ed gave me two boats as landmarks for where s/v Freedom was anchored. The first was a mega-yacht, which was very easy to spot due to is enormous size.

The mega-yacht that was anchored near us in Cuttyhunk Outer Harbor, which was lit up like a cruise ship for a good part of the night .

The mega-yacht that was anchored near us in Cuttyhunk Outer Harbor, which was lit up like a cruise ship for a good part of the night .

The other was this large blue-hulled sailboat.

A neighboring boat that thought not having any lights on all night long was a good idea. They’re a statistic waiting to happen in my opinion.

A neighboring boat that thought not having any lights on all night long was a good idea. They’re a statistic waiting to happen in my opinion.

I motored up to s/v Freedom and rafted up to her. She was lying to her 45 lb. Manson Supreme anchor, so we were probably good to go for the night. Here’s a photo I took Wednesday morning, July 15th, of the two boats rafted up together before we detached for the incoming thunderstorm.

s/v Pretty Gee rafted up to s/v Freedom. We detached before the storm hit and were anchored out separately.

s/v Pretty Gee rafted up to s/v Freedom. We detached before the storm hit and were anchored out separately.

After getting the nickel tour of s/v Freedom, a center cockpit Endeavour 42, we had dinner. s/v Freedom is well fitted out for cruising, with a wind generator, solar panels, full cockpit enclosure, and behind the mast furling, though I’m personally not a fan of mast furling systems. Here are some photos of s/v Freedom.

Detail of s/v Freedom’s behind the mast furling system.

Detail of s/v Freedom’s behind the mast furling system.

Detail of s/v Freedom’s flagstaff, windgen and backstay.

Detail of s/v Freedom’s flagstaff, windgen and backstay.

Sunrise detail photo of s/v Freedom’s cockpit, with a full enclosure.

Sunrise detail photo of s/v Freedom’s cockpit, with a full enclosure.

Dinner was grilled porkloin with rice and string beans, and a nice white wine. We sat up talking in the cockpit until a bit past midnight. The next morning I was heading back to Fairhaven and s/v Freedom was continuing west to Point Judith’s Harbor of Refuge.

I awoke early the next morning to take some photos of the sunrise before breakfast. Here are a couple of the pre-dawn light coloring the clouds over Cuttyhunk Harbor. Ed and Chris were sensibly still asleep.

Pre-dawn clouds over Pekinese Island and s/v Freedom’s bow.

Pre-dawn clouds over Pekinese Island and s/v Freedom’s bow.

Pre-dawn clouds over Nashuon Island and Cuttyhunk's outer harbor.

Pre-dawn clouds over Nashuon Island and Cuttyhunk’s outer harbor.

And here are a couple more of the sunrise:

Sunrise over s/v Freedom’s bow and Pekinese Island.

Sunrise over s/v Freedom’s bow and Pekinese Island.

Detail of the sunrise over the aft deck on s/v Freedom.

Detail of the sunrise over the aft deck on s/v Freedom.

For breakfast, we had a simple affair with Chris’s home made granola and coffee. After breakfast, we heard a NOAA warning saying there was a strong line of thunderstorms headed our way that was currently over Block Island not to far west of us. So Ed and I decided to separate the two boats and ride out the storms on our own anchors. I motored off and anchored s/v Pretty Gee a bit further west of s/v Freedom and rode out the storm there. While we weren’t bothered by the storm much, two boats in Cuttyhunk’s inner harbor did drag from radio reports.

After the storm, I took some photos of the system as it was leaving the area. Here’s one showing the tail end of the storm over Cuttyhunk and s/v Freedom.

s/v Freedom with the tail-end of the thunderstorm’s clouds overhead.

s/v Freedom with the tail-end of the thunderstorm’s clouds overhead.

And a couple more photos of the storm as it headed further east.

Thunderstorm leaving Cuttyhunk Harbor. Two boats dragged in Cuttyhunk’s inner harbor, but we were fine outside.

Thunderstorm leaving Cuttyhunk Harbor. Two boats dragged in Cuttyhunk’s inner harbor, but we were fine outside.

The storm as it rolled away.

The storm as it rolled away.

I then hailed s/v Freedom and said our goodbyes before hoisting the anchor and heading back to Fairhaven. On the way back to Fairhaven, I took this photo of the storm system as it was heading towards Vineyard Sound and Cape Cod.

The storm in the distance, over the Elizabeth Islands, of which Cuttyhunk is the southwestern most.

The storm in the distance, over the Elizabeth Islands, of which Cuttyhunk is the southwestern most.

It was great to meet Chris and Ed for the first time in real life.

Chris sitting in the cockpit of s/v Freedom after breakfast.

Chris sitting in the cockpit of s/v Freedom after breakfast.

Captain Ed in s/v Freedom’s cockpit after breakfast, before the thunderstorm rolled in.

Captain Ed in s/v Freedom’s cockpit after breakfast, before the thunderstorm rolled in.

I’ve been friends with them over the internet, via sailing forums and Facebook for several years, but this was my first time meeting them in person. They’re a lovely couple and I have asked Gee to watch over them on their future voyages aboard s/v Freedom. I wish them fair winds and following seas where ever they may end up voyaging.


No comments have been added to this post yet.

Leave a comment

(required)

(required)


Information for comment users
Line and paragraph breaks are implemented automatically. Your e-mail address is never displayed. Please consider what you're posting.

All comments are subject to review and approval
before being posted on this site.

Use the buttons below to customise your comment.


RSS feed for comments on this post | TrackBack URI